Minuscule Illustrations: Select

In October 2017 I came across an internet blog challenge for a story written in two sentences. I wrote a story. Liking the format, I did another one. Another one. And another.

Quite a few stories later, I had enough for a book. Not only did I have stories, but I had written a short poem and created a brush and India ink illustration for each one as well.

The result was Minuscule, published in 2018. I’m now going to show you the book illustrations as an ongoing feature on this blog, once a week. I’ll link back to the story (they have been published one by one on my poetry blog).

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And here’s something more … this is the last story to be posted from Minuscule. You’ve now read the entire book, if you have followed along over these months of posts.

If you would like to hold the entire book in your hands, the print version is available on Amazon.

“Select” is the title of today’s story. Look here to read it.

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Classwork: Painting #5

I took an online class in abstract painting during November/December 2020. For more info, see the introduction in this post featuring the first painting I did in the class.

The class was structured with a short lecture at the beginning of class covering an abstract painter’s work and using it as a springboard to discuss abstract art principles. Then we students painted at our individual studios.

Thank you to my fellow students and my teacher, Kassem Amoudi.

Here is the next painting in this series. It’s called Hurry and it’s 20″ x 16″, done in acrylics.

And here is the progression as it went through its creation:

This painting did not change much over the couple of weeks I worked on it after it got to a near-finished stage. I kept adding or substracting a little here or there. Finally I just stopped. It was fine. Let it be.

Scrape Paint Across a Postcard

Bothe of these postcards, made in September 2020, have acrylic paint scraped across them to create textures or visual interest. What I do is take a plastic scraper (the kind you would buy to use in spackling – they often come in sets of three, in different sizes), put a blob of paint on the art, and scrape across the image.

In this way a layer of paint is laid down. You can make it as thick or thin as you like. I often use a knitting needle or the end of my paintbrush to scribble lines in it.

You can also use the technique as a printing method. Scrape out the paint, scratch or scribble or whatever in it, and then press it to another artwork. The design will be transferred.

As another idea, a scraped-paint background can be made very quickly and then you can draw, collage, or paint on top of it.

Go on, give it a try!

Classwork: Painting #4

I took an online class in abstract painting during November/December 2020. For more info, see the introduction in this post featuring the first painting I did in the class.

The class was structured with a short lecture at the beginning of class covering an abstract painter’s work and using it as a springboard to discuss abstract art principles. Then we students painted at our individual studios.

Thank you to my fellow students and my teacher, Kassem Amoudi.

Here is another painting from the series of works done in class. This one is called Ascend, and it is 20″ x 16″, done in acrylics.

You may notice the drawn lines in this painting – there have been similar marks in earlier ones, too. They are made with acrylic paint markers. I have always used white and black markers of this type, but sparingly. The instructor mentioned them in one of the lectures and I realized, in a belated light-bulb moment, that they came in all colors, and that I would really like to have a selection.

I ordered some and I’ve been using them. I really like the effect they give.

And, as you know, there are multiple stages to a painting, some of which I recorded when I emailed photos of WIP for the instructor’s examination. Here is what I can show you of the image’s process, earlier stages going to the later ones.

As a note, the colors are not corrected so that the images match each other as they should – I didn’t take the time. The final image is the one that most looks like the painting as it is.

Small Wordless Sketchbook 2020 Pages 12 and 13

In March-June 2020 I created a sketchbook full of art made from odds and ends I had saved. The book has no words, just pictures. I am showing you the whole book, two facing pages at a time. The book was finished in June. I made it to help myself feel better as I passed through the early days of the pandemic.

Here are the project’s specifics.The book is a mixed media sketchbook that’s 5.5″ x 7.5″. I used collage materials including magazine pages and scraps of my own discarded artworks, as well as acrylic paints and inks, India ink, and pens, regular brushes, and bamboo brushes.

Here are pages 12 and 13 as they appeared in the book:

Here are more detailed images of the pages.

Minuscule Illustrations: Fable

In October 2017 I came across an internet blog challenge for a story written in two sentences. I wrote a story. Liking the format, I did another one. Another one. And another.

Quite a few stories later, I had enough for a book. Not only did I have stories, but I had written a short poem and created a brush and India ink illustration for each one as well.

The result was Minuscule, published in 2018. I’m now going to show you the book illustrations as an ongoing feature on this blog, once a week. I’ll link back to the story (they have been published one by one on my poetry blog).

If you want to hold the entire book in your hand, the print version is available on Amazon.

“Fable” is the title of the story. Look here to read it.

 

Classwork: Painting #3

I took an online class in abstract painting during November/December 2020. For more info, see the introduction in this post featuring the first painting I did in the class.

The class was structured with a short lecture at the beginning of class covering an abstract painter’s work and using it as a springboard to discuss abstract art principles. Then we students painted at our individual studios.

Thank you to my fellow students and my teacher, Kassem Amoudi.

Here’s another painting in this series of work – it’s called Ghost Table. It’s 20″ x 16″.

In the class, we paint as we go, and when we want some help or advice, we email a photo to the instructor, who shows it on the screen. A by-product of this process is that I have WIP photos to show you. So, here is the progression:

Me

I think I mentioned I took an online phone camera photography class back in the fall, 2020. I learned a lot in this class and I practiced some of the ideas on myself. At the risk of seeming self-obsessed, I will show you some of the photos.

With a couple of simple apps there is a lot that can be done to make an ordinary photo interesting, and I enjoyed trying out the different ideas brought out in the class, such as unusual angles or cropping, blurring, or distorting. Even some plain old feet can have their moment…

Small Wordless Sketchbook 2020 Pages 10 and 11

In March-June 2020 I created a sketchbook full of art made from odds and ends I had saved. The book has no words, just pictures. I am showing you the whole book, two facing pages at a time. The book was finished in June. I made it to help myself feel better as I passed through the early days of the pandemic.

Here are the project’s specifics.The book is a mixed media sketchbook that’s 5.5″ x 7.5″. I used collage materials including magazine pages and scraps of my own discarded artworks, as well as acrylic paints and inks, India ink, and pens, regular brushes, and bamboo brushes.

Here are pages 10 and 11 as they appear in my book …

Here are the pages in more detail.