Another Painting Class, Session 2: Painting 6

In February/March I took an online painting class at Woodmere Art Museum in Philadelphia, PA. The class was called BLENDING ABSTRACTION AND REPRESENTATION, and over 5 sessions our class explored the continuum between these two endpoints of a line. This set of classes is a continuation of the previous group with the same teacher and the same group of students.

The class was structured so that we worked on our individual artworks in our home studios while participating in discussions and vewing demonstrations by the teacher. I did quite a bit of work and I’ll be showing them to you over a few posts.

Thanks to my instructor, Lesa Chittenden Lim, and my classmates, for a good experience.

The class assignment was to examine what paths we might like to take our art along in the future.

I did a post on this topic at the end of the first class with some detail: look here if you want to see it.

As you may imagine I have a lot of ideas. But one thing I would like to do is to paint more pictures of people – either portraits or peopled scenes. This idea is something new to me and I will have to give it more thought.

In the meantime, I decided to represent myself as a portrait. I took a photo with my phone and got to work. Here is the result.

“Self-Portrait”, 3/21, acrylics on masonite, 24″ x 18″

A Visit to the Delaware Art Museum 4/24/21

A visit to the Delaware Art Museum.

Sometimes You Get So Confused

Well, the title of the post tells you the topic. Now, let fill in some background and then…I’ll give you a tour.

The pandemic has jolted me into action. What do I mean? Well, before March 2020 many patterns in my life were ending and I had not had much success in picking up the threads and beginning new ones. Flip the calendar pages to April 2021 and without going into the tiresome details of all the thinking and reflecting I have done in light of the severe shaking the past year’s events have given to my emotions and worldview, what has come out of it is this:

Stop wasting time. Get busy and get moving.

Maybe I have oversimplified it a bit but believe me, you’re happier with the short version of the plan rather than a line item discussion. Suffice it to say, my idea is, if I…

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Viral Imaginations in Pennsylvania

You may remember that last year I submitted a painting to the virtual exhibit sponsored by Penn State, called Viral Imaginations: Covid 19. This exhibit was put together by a collaborating group at the university, involving medical, liberal arts, and ethics departments, and administrators, educators, and students.

The purpose of the exhibit was to

  • give Pennsylvanians a place to speak about the pandemic and its effects on them personally
  • create an archive of the times
  • provide materials for others to use in various ways for now and into the future, such as lessons and research
  • to create a place for people to go and feel the companionship of others as we all work our way through the pandemic

Last night my husband and I attended the Zoom reception for artists.

I didn’t know what to expect, having never attended a Zoom artist reception. After a little bit of coaxing the Zoom entry process to let us in, we arrived and listened to an overview of the project. I had not comprehended the scope of the effort or how much the archive/exhibit is already in use by teachers and researchers, for instance.

We (virtually) met the persons responsible for putting the site together. Then we listened to poetry from the site read to us as we looked at images from the visual art. Interspersed among the readings were short sessions devoted to the themes the curators found that repeated in the exhibit. Leter we saw a review of all the visual art on the site.

It was very moving. The poems brought back memories from the early days of the pandemic, often upsetting ones. I was reminded how terrified I was about grocery shopping, for instance, while listening to a poem on that subject.

My painting was called “I Hope”. Here it is:

I was surprised and thrilled to learn that it was included as part of a school lesson plan based on a pandemic theme, Cartography. I had no idea this had happened until my painting and name appeared on the screen! Look here to see the lesson plan – it relates to the home and its place in the world during the pandemic and is aimed at grades K-6.

I am honored and humbled that my artwork could maybe be of some benefit, especially to kids. And this morning I am still feeling a sense of – calmness and gratitude, maybe? – that this event unexpectedly brought to me.

There is much focus, rightly so, on all the losses and griefs of this time, and the exhibit does not shy away from them – instead it faces them.

But the fact there is this exhibit, that there will be an archive and our thoughts and feelings remembered, that it is important to try to make sense of what has happened, and that people are creating art and writing even in these times – all of this made me feel hope.

Even though the pandemic is not over, as was mentioned several times in the presentations, I came away feeling hope. A year later I still hope.

********************

Thank you to Penn State and all who have worked on this archive.

Here is the link to my painting on its page at the site.

Here is a link to my post on the exhibit submission from 2020.

If you live or work in Pennsylvania, you can still submit your art or writings related to the pandemic to Viral Imaginations. They will be accepting submissions at least until the end of the year.

Small Wordless Sketchbook 2020 Pages 40 and 41

In March-June 2020 I created a sketchbook full of art made from odds and ends I had saved. The book has no words, just pictures. I am showing you the whole book, two facing pages at a time. The book was finished in June. I made it to help myself feel better as I passed through the early days of the pandemic.

Here are the project’s specifics.The book is a mixed media sketchbook that’s 5.5″ x 7.5″. I used collage materials including magazine pages and scraps of my own discarded artworks, as well as acrylic paints and inks, India ink, and pens, regular brushes, and bamboo brushes.

Here are the pages as they appear in the book:

Here is a more detailed look at the images.

Another Painting Class, Session 2: Painting 5

In February/March I took an online painting class at Woodmere Art Museum in Philadelphia, PA. The class was called BLENDING ABSTRACTION AND REPRESENTATION, and over 5 sessions our class explored the continuum between these two endpoints of a line. This set of classes is a continuation of the previous group with the same teacher and the same group of students.

The class was structured so that we worked on our individual artworks in our home studios while participating in discussions and vewing demonstrations by the teacher. I did quite a bit of work and I’ll be showing them to you over a few posts.

Thanks to my instructor, Lesa Chittenden Lim, and my classmates, for a good experience.

After completing the original class assignment of painting an emotion, which I amended to just…painting something abstract, I found I enjoyed the process, so I did more. Here is one. It is called “Fly” and it is 24″ x 18″ on masonite.

Someone asked me in the class why I named it as I did. I was not really sure how to answer. It looked sort of insect-like to me, yes. And it seemed to have a lot of flying off pieces to it. And…I don’t know, that is the word that came to mind.

I am surprised that I liked doing these abstracts – I have never found a way into the abstract with no representational elements world before that didn’t make me feel stressed and anxious. The key seems to be, forget what you are doing and just do. So…it becomes just pleasure to be painting.

Another Painting Class, Session 2: Painting 4

In February/March I took an online painting class at Woodmere Art Museum in Philadelphia, PA. The class was called BLENDING ABSTRACTION AND REPRESENTATION, and over 5 sessions our class explored the continuum between these two endpoints of a line. This set of classes is a continuation of the previous group with the same teacher and the same group of students.

The class was structured so that we worked on our individual artworks in our home studios while participating in discussions and vewing demonstrations by the teacher. I did quite a bit of work and I’ll be showing them to you over a few posts.

Thanks to my instructor, Lesa Chittenden Lim, and my classmates, for a good experience.

This painting is the third one I did as a group to meet our class assignment, which was to choose an emotion and depict it in a totally abstract way. I made some attempts in my sketchbook – and I wasn’t satisfied with them. To me, emotions are not paintable. Things, people, events, that evoke emotions, they are visible and can be depicted. That’s how I see things.

So I decided I would just paint in an abstract manner. My goal was to make nothing recognizable in the picture, just paint.

As I also said earlier, I worked on more than one painting at a time. I like having a lot of choices in front of me and it keeps things fresh and moving along to skip from one painting to another. I liked that feeling!

Here is the third in this series. It is called “Loops” and is acrylics on masonite, 18″ x 24″.

Another Painting Class, Session 2: Painting 3

In February/March I took an online painting class at Woodmere Art Museum in Philadelphia, PA. The class was called BLENDING ABSTRACTION AND REPRESENTATION, and over 5 sessions our class explored the continuum between these two endpoints of a line. This set of classes is a continuation of the previous group with the same teacher and the same group of students.

The class was structured so that we worked on our individual artworks in our home studios while participating in discussions and vewing demonstrations by the teacher. I did quite a bit of work and I’ll be showing them to you over a few posts.

Thanks to my instructor, Lesa Chittenden Lim, and my classmates, for a good experience.

As I said in the previous post, our class assignment was to choose an emotion and depict it in a totally abstract way. I made some attempts in my sketchbook – and I wasn’t satisfied with them. To me, emotions are not paintable. Things, people, events, that evoke emotions, they are visible and can be depicted. That’s how I see things.

So I decided I would just paint in an abstract manner. My goal was to make nothing recognizable in the picture, just paint. This painting was done at the same time as the one in the previous post. Working on more than one picture at a time helps me keep from overworking/overthinking. Just paint!

Here is the second in this series. It is called “Heavy Circle” and is 11″ x 14″ on masonite.

Small Wordless Sketchbook 2020 Pages 38 and 39

In March-June 2020 I created a sketchbook full of art made from odds and ends I had saved. The book has no words, just pictures. I am showing you the whole book, two facing pages at a time. The book was finished in June. I made it to help myself feel better as I passed through the early days of the pandemic.

Here are the project’s specifics.The book is a mixed media sketchbook that’s 5.5″ x 7.5″. I used collage materials including magazine pages and scraps of my own discarded artworks, as well as acrylic paints and inks, India ink, and pens, regular brushes, and bamboo brushes.

Here are the pages as they appear in the book:

Here is a more detailed look at the images.

Another Painting Class, Session 2: Painting 2

In February/March I took an online painting class at Woodmere Art Museum in Philadelphia, PA. The class was called BLENDING ABSTRACTION AND REPRESENTATION, and over 5 sessions our class explored the continuum between these two endpoints of a line. This set of classes is a continuation of the previous group with the same teacher and the same group of students.

The class was structured so that we worked on our individual artworks in our home studios while participating in discussions and vewing demonstrations by the teacher. I did quite a bit of work and I’ll be showing them to you over a few posts.

Thanks to my instructor, Lesa Chittenden Lim, and my classmates, for a good experience.

Our class assignment was to choose an emotion and depict it in a totally abstract way. I made some attempts in my sketchbook – and I wasn’t satisfied with them. To me, emotions are not paintable. Things, people, events, that evoke emotions, they are visible and can be depicted. That’s how I see things.

So I decided I would just paint in an abstract manner. My goal was to make nothing recognizable in the picture, just paint. Here is the first in this series.

I found something very satisfying about just letting the painting develop, put colors next to colors, and move to another area of the painting. No planning, just let the story tell itself. It was relaxing when I stopped trying to control things. I liked that.