Tag Archives: collage/mixed media

ATC’s from Leftovers

Sometimes you have a scrap of something you just know will come in handy, or is too good to let go of. It waits around until its turn comes. Here are a couple of examples.

This animal was originally just a random ink blob surrounding an odd-shaped white section (the head part). I immediately saw it as a head, but didn’t get around to doing anything with it until one night, the scrap fell out of my leftover box. I got out my pen and made him a body. Next stop – ATC.

ATC sheep-like animal 4-2001

This is a two for one leftover meal – the card was painted for another purpose but not used, and the legs were a try-out sketch for a bigger drawing. Put them together and here you have another ATC.

ATC legs on a red background 4-2002

Paper Dolls and Paper Doll Animals

I made these in December 2019 and mailed them to a friend.

I’ve made plenty of paper dolls but no animals, until now.

Library Cards and Library Books and Art

Some time back I bought a supply of yellow and white library check-out cards – the old kind where you used to fill in your name and the librarian stamped it with her date stamp. I know they are still in use out in the library world, because they are still being sold, but my library uses the bar code and the computer now.

Anyway, I like their associations and I like using them for all kinds of projects and just for note card reminders, too. (You can buy them online from library supply companies. They are inexpensive and sturdy).

Anyway. One of the things I do as part of my poetry writing is to cut out random phrases from discarded books (yes, I get them from my library, too!). They look like this when they are in use for that purpose:

PO 9-6-19 #3

After I have wrung them dry of poetry ideas I turn them into collages. I’ve done different things with them over time but here is the latest incarnation. All I did was scrape paints over them, using the corrugations of the pasted-on print to help make a pattern.

I like the look of them. I guess I might be starting a collection.

 

Let’s Trade!

Here are a some ATC’s I made as part of my teaching duties at my mixed media class from earlier this year. I created them as part of our session on mail art and other social art (art meant to share), so that they could be part of a trading session our class did.

ATC Advice Emerging Out of Somewhere But Where?

ATC Advice is my own category for this kind of ATC card. Simple to make. Make an ATC. Put a phrase cut from print on it. Pick the phrase at random; do not try to match it to the card.

Read the words, look at the picture, and see what you get from the juxtaposition.

You may be surprised. The ATC Advice method quite often offers something astute or insightful or maybe just head-scratching.

Let's try it small

 

ATC Advice Can Be Cryptic To Say the Least

ATC Advice is my own category for this kind of ATC card. Simple to make. Make an ATC. Put a phrase cut from print on it. Pick the phrase at random; do not try to match it to the card.

Read the words, look at the picture, and see what you get from the juxtaposition.

You may be surprised. The ATC Advice method quite often offers something astute or insightful or maybe just head-scratching.

 

ATC advice his life 1-1911

ATC Advice I Stand Here to Tell You…

ATC Advice is my own category for this kind of ATC card. Simple to make. Make an ATC. Put a phrase cut from print on it. Pick the phrase at random; do not try to match it to the card.

Read the words, look at the picture, and see what you get from the juxtaposition.

You may be surprised. The ATC Advice method quite often offers something astute or insightful or maybe just head-scratching.

 

Impromptu Still Life

In the mixed media class I taught from January-March 2020, there came a day when we did mixed media still life.

We set up some objects and the students got to work. To keep myself from hovering over them, I started to work on this piece and finished it later at home.

I’m not very reality-oriented in my rendition. For example, the red circly things at the bottom represent a swath of bubble wrap spread on the table.

Just saying.

“Impromptu Still Life”, acrylics/paper/ink on canvas, 20″ x 16″, 2/2020.

Impromptu Still Life 20 x 16

Let’s Say You Have a Photo and You Want to Make a Collage Image Inspired By It…

I’ve made lots of collages that were based on a photo where I intended the finished image to adhere somewhat faithfully to the photo’s inspiration.

Like these collages below, all made in the early 2000’s from photos I took of actual scenes.

(Painted paper collages, sizes varying from 4″ x 6″ to 18″ x 24″)

Here’s the question this post will answer – if you have an image that requires you to follow a plan, how do you do it?

Here’s how I did it. You need some materials: a photo, pencil, your collage support, tracing paper, a pen.

Tracing Drawing #6 materials 10-192

First step. Using your photo, draw the image on your support. You can do this freehand, or you can use a grid system. In either case, the idea is to make a representation of the masses and shapes of your final collage image. It’s not necessary to fill in details – such as architectural elements or stripes on a person’s shirt. Just stick with the big picture, so to speak.

I often draw the image upside down. It keeps me honest about focusing on shapes and forms rather than drawing what I think I see or what I think might be there.

Tracing Drawing start to draw #1 10-196

Here is your drawing, compared to the photo. I did this one freehand. If it were imperative to have correct proportions, I would have used graph paper or drawn a grid on the paper to follow. Otherwise, I have made editorial decisions here – you can see already what the image will include and what it will not, and that I am not very concerned about perfect scale or perspective. But I do want my finished image to resemble what I have drawn.

Tracing Drawing #2 10-195

Next step. Trace over the lines with a pen. You do this so that you can see the lines very clearly because…

Tracing Drawing #3 ink outline 10-194

the next step is to trace the image on the tracing paper. With the lines on the support outlined in ink, you can see what you are doing very easily.

Tracing Drawing #5 tracing 10-191



 

Now, let’s think about what we are going to be doing to create this collage image.

  • I will take pieces of paper and glue them down.
  • I will work from the back of the image (the sky) to the front (the porch area at the bottom of the picture).
  • I’m going to use this drawing as my guide to know where to glue the papers.

But…as I glue, I will be covering up the lines that I have drawn on my support. And then how will I know if I am following my image’s outlines, etc.? Because if I don’t, it is very likely that among other things, the picture will “drift” – in other words, I will be a little off, and a little off, and then I get to the end of the picture and…wait, what happened to the porch? I don’t have room for it!

So this is why you do this next thing. Set your support, with its sketch, on your worktable. Tape the tracing paper sketch to it, matching it with the one on the support, so that you can flip the tracing paper layer back and off the support.

Tracing Drawing #4 tape 10-193

 

To get to work…Flip the tracing paper back off the support layer. Start working on the sky. As you glue, you will eventually reach the roof area. Keep putting down paper for the sky, letting the sky extend a little over the line into the roof area.

It’s not like in mosaic making where you abut the elements; collage allows you to layer and then cover with another layer to create a division between shapes.

Don’t worry, even though you have just obliterated the line that shows you the extent of the roof against the sky because you have glued papers over it.

Just flip the tracing paper layer back over the support, align it as necessary, and you can see exactly where you need to start the the roof-line. Yes! it is right there on your tracing paper guide.

You may glue a roof into place with confidence. See how it works?



 

You are probably saying- If only I could see the project in process and finished. Well, I cannot show you, because I did not go on to make a collage in this instance. I use this set of materials as a sample for teaching a mixed media class in how to set up a mixed media piece when exactitude is of importance.

Maybe someday I will take this preparation and go on to make a mixed media piece…

*******************

What I can show you is what I did with the photo in real life. I used it as the basis for this painting that I did in 2013. Acrylics, 16 x 20 (I think). The original photo was of row houses in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

City Rows, 2013

City Rows, 2013.