Tag Archives: collage

2003 Calendar – May

Here’s a project I did in 2001-2002 that I had forgotten about. Now, here in 2022, I will take a trip down memory lane and show it to you, once each month.

Why this schedule? Because it is a calendar. For 2003.

I made three of these – one for my son, one for my parents, and one for my husband. It’s the last one that I am showing to you. They were all alike except for the covers.

I hoped this calendar could be a small record of a certain time in our family. I do not know if my son still has his version, and my parents now are dead and their things scattered and gone, but here is the version we still have at our house, a voice speaking up again from the past.

If you want to know more about this calendar, look here.

Here is the collage image I used for the month of May, 2003. It’s called “May Iris Garden” and was 14″ x 11″.

Here is the page in the calendar. As a note, Andrew in #1 is my son and May is his birthday month. Clovis, mention in #2, was one of our cats. In #3 I refer to mowing the grass – that was my job and one I still do today, quite willingly as I like mowing the grass and always have. #8 refers to my art show schedule – at this time, I was doing 20 or so shows a year with most of them occurring between the months of May through October.

The rest of this month’s notes show our preoccupation with gardening at that time – we had a large yard with flowers and vegetables, including a section that we seeded with wildflowers for a kind of meadow effect.

Happy May!

2003 Calendar – April

I was doing some cleaning out and reorganizing recently and I came upon a project I did in 2001-2002 that I had forgotten about. Now, here in 2022, I will take a trip down memory lane and show it to you, once each month.

Why this schedule? Because it is a calendar. For 2003.

I made three of these – one for my son, one for my parents, and one for my husband. It’s the last one that I am showing to you. They were all alike except for the covers.

I covered two pieces of matboard with handpainted papers and secured the pages with sections of leather shoelaces wrapped with copper wire.

Inside, I had printed a page for each month with a collage image appropriate to the month. Additionally, I wrote out various things our family thought about or enjoyed doing during the month. Below it, as is usual with a calendar, were the days of the month (I won’t be showing them as it’s just a standard grid, though I did fill the empty day spaces with haiku or poetry, as mentioned above).

I hoped this calendar could be a small record of a certain time in our family. I do not know if my son still has his version, and my parents now are dead and their things scattered and gone, but here it is, a voice speaking up again from the past.

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Here is the collage image I used for the month of April, 2003. It’s called “April Daffodils” and was 14″ x 11″.

Here is the page in the calendar. As a note, Luna, as mentioned in #1, was one of our cats. The robins mentioned in #4 was a family tradition – ever since my son had a kindergarten assignment to make note of when he saw the first robin in spring, I have mentally done the same. You may be interested to know that at the time of this calendar he was in high school. And the geraniums in #9, well – I love geraniums and I have had at least a few pots of them every spring and summer for decades.

Happy April!

Artist Book Pages from a Book Being Made by Two Long-Distance Friends: Three

Marcy Erb at Illustrated Poetry and I have been blog friends for years, and even better, we have actually met in person, some years ago. Our most recent doings involve an artist book project collaboration that has had a long history – I think we got it started in 2016? Maybe? If you want all the details, look here for my first post about the project, where I give more information.

Here I am showing you some random images, pages where I did only one side of the page spread and left the other one for Marcy to create however she might like.

You can see that I incorporated some parts of the book’s earlier library life – the card pocket, the bar code (right there is a tangible picture of how times have changed, isn’t it?)

In the cat picture, the book arrived with the cut out chromosones on the page, put in place by Marcy. I took that theme and in some way made a connection with the idea of a cat, which I then set out on the page. No one says any of this process has to make the kind of sense that we ordinarily see in everyday life.

That’s another thing about these book projects: sometimes you do a whole page by yourself, and other times, both artists mix their work.

I have done other collaborative projects and I have also made quite a few of these artist books. Here is a partial list. You can also check under the category Artist Books, here on my blog.

Note: You might like to click on the images and see them in the viewer; back when I was doing a lot of these books I was new to blogging and did not understand making the photos larger in the actual post…

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A Tossed Salad of a Book

Small Book, Pages and Poem Form

Create Your Own Library

And my favorite book that I have made, In November. Because in November is when I was born and it’s my time of year.

Here is a beautiful project I did with Sharon Mann some years ago: Nothing But Sunshine

We, Sharon and I, also made two decks of playing cards: Pick a Card, Any Card

If you have any questions let me know. Maybe making an art book is for you!

Artist Book Pages from a Book Being Made by Two Long-Distance Friends: Two

Marcy Erb at Illustrated Poetry and I have been blog friends for years, and even better, we have actually met in person, some years ago. Our most recent doings involve an artist book project collaboration that has had a long history – I think we got it started in 2016? Maybe? If you want all the details, look here for my first post about the project, where I give more information.

Now, here are some more pages. I seem not to have separate images, so you can just take a look at them as a page spread.

As a note, Marcy is a scientist, and by coincidence this book was a very outdated non-fiction book on atomic energy. Interesting, that serendipity! You can see evidences of the book’s subject in the bits of text and illustration I incorporated.

More images to show you in another post!

Artist Book Pages from a Book Being Made by Two Long-Distance Friends: One

Marcy Erb at Illustrated Poetry and I have been blog friends for years, and even better, we have actually met in person, some years ago. Our most recent doings involve an artist book project collaboration that has had a long history – I think we got it started in 2016? Maybe?

Anyway, not too long ago Marcy revived the project, and sent me the book. Usually when I do collaborative projects like this there are two books, so that we can each keep one. This time, for various reasons, there is just this one, and it is for Marcy to keep. I did some pages in it over the past 6-8 months, and now it’s in her hands to finish as she would like. I hope she will look at the pages and remember our friendship. I feel lucky to know her.

Anyway, I took photos of a few of my favorite pages. I don’t think she’ll mind if I show them here. They are out of context, but that’s ok. Each page is mean to be enjoyed on its own as well as with its fellows.

I set up the original ” book canvas”. I took a discarded children’s library book and glued some of its pages together to give a strong surface for paint or collage. Then we got to work on it.

Take a look at these pages. First, I’ll show you two images and then how they appear together in the book.

Here they are as a page spread.

More images to show you in another post!

Library Card Collages

Here’s how it goes. I take a library card (purchased from a library supply company, because I like these cards for many reasons, including their nostalgia value for me).

I paste cut-out words or phrases on each one. These snips are random selections from old books. I fill up the card.

I write poetry using these out-of-the-blue words or phrases and I let them take me wherever they want to go.

Then, I color the cards. Because I think it’s fun and they are pretty.

That’s about it.

Take a look at a recent group.

Person and Bird

Here is a small fabric piece made in August, 2020. It is about 6″ x 6″.

Just for fun, here is a photo of the back of the piece. You can see the stitching and you can also see where in my careless haste to keep moving along I sewed scraps of fabric to the back. No idea I did that until I looked, later.

Outdoor Art Time

On June 30 a couple of art friends and I got together in my back yard to do some art work and visit a little. I think it was a good way to assemble in a safe way and enjoy ourselves, in these times as they are. Here’s what we did.

I met these two friends in the mixed media class I taught last year. We have stayed in touch and wanted to get together. But how? I volunteered my back yard. We picked a day, and luckily it turned out great weather-wise, sunny, but not too hot, and no threat of rain.

Here’s what we did:

First hint: have shade available, or a shelter from the sun. I figured I could set up my tent (that I use in art shows) but it was not necessary. Our yard is very shady.

Second hint: Make sure there is a comfortable amount of room to spread out. We decided to wear our masks as we set things up, then, as long as we remained at our table, or ten or twelve feet apart, we took them off. Then we put them back on to clean things up. Having plenty of room made things comfortable.

Third hint: Bathroom. I had one available nearby, involving walking in my back door into my studio and going only a short distance inside the house. I did a **SPARKLE** clean on that tiny room and had towels ready for hand-washing so each person could have her own.

Fourth hint: Tables and chairs available. Or some kind of area to set up so that each person can have a good space to work. Alternatively each person could have brought her own chair and table, or whatever she needed to work comfortably, but this needs to be settled up front.

Fifth hint: Cleaning items. I set up a table with hand sanitizer, spray cleaner, and towels if anyone wanted to clean anything, and I also put out some bug spray, just in case…

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Well, we had a great time. Here are some pictures. Here is where I sat:

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and here is our general set-up. We were facing each other so that we could talk or show each other our work.

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Mary Ann made a lot of painted papers and she set them on the grass to dry.

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I put out the red buckets of water for washing brushes and so on. The hose was just around the corner of the house if we had needed more water.

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Here are Mary Ann and Andy cleaning their things up and packing after the session.

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Things went smoothly with this set-up. We were comfortable and felt safe. All of us are living very cautiously right now, and this allowed us to get together and experience a bit of an activity we really value – doing art with others. I am so happy we were able to pull this off, it meant a lot to me.

Shout out to Andy and Mary Ann, for a real spirit lifter!

 

 

ATC Advice With a Red Background

ATC Advice is my own category for this kind of ATC card. Simple to make. Make an ATC. Put a phrase cut from print on it. Pick the phrase at random; do not try to match it to the card.

Read the words, look at the picture, and see what you get from the juxtaposition.

You may be surprised. The ATC Advice method quite often offers something astute or insightful or maybe just head-scratching.

Here are a couple of cards from January 2019.

Revisits: Main Theme

I did some illustrations for an event at Fictive Dream, an online fiction magazine specializing in short stories. It’s called “Revisits”. In it, the magazine revisits “the best of the back catalog”, as editor Laura Black says. Every two weeks April through August 2019, a different theme was explored. Look here to see the line-up of stories from the event and to read them.

I wrote a series of posts explaining the art creation process for this event. Look here for the first post, Love, which also offers an overview of the parameters of the art aspects of this project; for the other themes, search under the term Revisits in this blog.

In addition to the illustrations for each theme covered in the Revisits event, I did an artwork intended for the main page of the Revisits 2019 page at Fictive Dream, the place where readers could go to access the collection of stories in one place. It’s a title page illustration, as I think of it, for a “book” of collected short stories.

As such it needed to fit in with the illustrations done for each individual theme: landscape, sky, tree(s). For this picture the choices were wide open – there was no theme to illustrate.

I did the work on this image at the beginning of the project. Looking back, waiting until the end might have been better, but I was not sure how quickly I’d get the theme illustrations done and I was afraid the event would begin, I had not done all the illustrations, and yet we needed the Main Theme illustration to be in place at the event page.

You may remember that Fictive Dream editor Laura Black and I were feeling our way with the illustrations for a little while in the beginning until we got a few produced and began to know what we wanted. This Main Theme illustration was part of that “feeling our way” process.

Originally my thought was to include an array of colors in the landscape to portray the variety of themes and stories in the collection. I came up with this collage:

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Laura liked it but it was not what she was looking for. As an artist, it can be hard to hear this kind of news; even though it’s not a criticism of the work, it means I’ve missed the mark. But in commission work, missing the mark is not failure – it’s a way to better understand where the mark actually is and to try again.

When I was auditioning styles for the project, as the very first step, I submitted quite a few images to Laura as we worked out the picture, the text, the text placement and style, etc. I made some wildly different pictures to gauge her interest:

I am sure you can see the one that caught her attention. I had created it from magazine papers unified with a layer of paint, text digitally applied. Anyway, when we got to the Main Theme image she reminded me of this one and how she had liked it.

I created a new version in the same colors but using painted sketch papers so as to fit in with the other theme illustrations. The text is slightly larger to fill in the space better (since there is no theme word, using the same size type made the word Revisits look a little scared and lost!)

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This picture fit the bill. I liked the look of it and more importantly, Laura felt it was a good long-term representative for the overall Revisits event as people visit it now or in the future.


This post wraps up the Revisits illustration event on my blog. Once again I’d like to thank Laura Black for her faith in my work and her unfailing support of it. She is a true pleasure to work for. And thank you to everyone for following me on this journey.

Now I’d urge you take a look at the stories:  here at Fictive Dream: Revisits.