Tag Archives: Fictive Dream

A Birdbath Story

You know that I have done a lot of illustrations for the online short story magazine Fictive Dream. I love working with editor Laura Black and the process of turning words into pictures is always a challenge and a joy to me.

I’ve done an illustration for a story published today, 7/31. I’ll tell you about my work process and then you can check out the story at Fictive Dream.

In recent times, I’ve been searching my archive of images for ones that might fit the story, rather than creating new work. My mind has been scattered given the situation we are living in right now and my focus on work equally scattered.

In these days, Laura provides me with information about what she’d like to see in an illustration, rather than me reading the story and coming up with ideas – having less information actually seems to free my mind in considering all kinds of options for paintings, collages, fabric art, postcards, etc., that I look through to find an image.

For this story, An Assortment of Trolls by Gary Fincke, she wanted a picture including a birdbath in a garden. She said: The writer describes the bird bath like this: “It was ornate, the kind of scrollwork that reminded me of the rococo columns.”

Well, I have a love for birdbaths, and I decided to create this image from scratch.

What I did was draw an assortment of birdbaths from photos found on the internet, using pen and ink. Then I scanned them. I do this so that if something goes wrong in the assembly of the artwork, I did not destroy my carefully-created drawings.

Here they are:

Next, I created a garden background. I used acrylic paints washed over the paper, and then I drew in the garden using a pen. This picture is about 11.5″ x 7.25″.

Birdbath story background 7-20

Now, I carefully cut out each scanned image and temporarily attached it to the background, scanning the combined compositions. Here they are:

Which one did Laura pick? Well, you’ll need to go to Fictive Dream and read the story to find out!

La Petite Mort

You may remember that I’ve done some illustration work for the online fiction magazine Fictive Dream. I love working for editor Laura Black and I also love being involved in the world of short fiction in this way. I’ve found the process of reading a story and turning it to something visual to be really satisfying in a way I can’t quite describe – there’s the challenge of “seeing” what the words say and then conveying it that I love.

Recently Laura asked me if I would illustrate an upcoming story for the magazine. Given the world situation at the time she asked me, in April, I was not focusing very well and it seemed to me that coming up with an illustration that would do justice to a story was just beyond me.

As with another story I worked on at that time, I searched my archives to see if anything might fill the bill. I have literally thousands of images of my artworks dating back twenty years and I thought I might find something there to work from.

Contrary to my usual practice, I did not want to read the story itself, feeling that doing so would cause me to restrict the possibilities and overlook something that might work. Therefore, I asked her for a general idea of what she was looking for. It worked out well – I was able to come up with a variety of images of wildly differing subjects.

I sent Laura a selection of images. It so happened that I did not have anything for the story she was thinking of, but there was one that worked for a different story, La Petite Mort, by Louis Gallo.

Here is the image she chose, a mail art postcard:

Postcard marionette figure 3-1801

But, as you may remember from previous posts I have done on illustrating for Fictive Dream, the layout of the image needs to be landscape-oriented, not portrait. Laura was thinking of simply turning the image on its side. But I felt I could give her a better set of options.

I tried some digital collaging techniques and, using my original image, created some digital collages that fit the size and orientation parameters. Here they are:

 

I sent the assortment to Laura and she liked the idea, choosing one to illustrate the story.



Now it’s up to you:

Go to Fictive Dream and read the story – see  which one Laura chose and how it fits the story…

*******

Now that you’ve viewed the art, here’s more info if you are interested in seeing past works of illustration for Fictive Dream – I’ve given a few links and if you want to know more, search my blog under the topic: Fictive Dream. 

September Slam 2018

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits 2019

And…here are links to the events at the magazine’s site, Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits

Lebruchio & Father, Movers

You may remember that I’ve done some illustration work for the online fiction magazine Fictive Dream. I love working for editor Laura Black and I also love being involved in the world of short fiction in this way. I’ve found the process of reading a story and turning it to something visual to be really satisfying in a way I can’t quite describe – there’s the challenge of “seeing” what the words say and then conveying it that I love.

Recently Laura asked me if I would illustrate an upcoming story for the magazine. I was happy to do so. The story, Lebruchio & Father, Movers, by Louis Gallo, appears today at Fictive Dream.

I used a variety of materials and techniques in these images. For Image 1, I collaged painted magazine papers to make the house against an acrylic-painted background (the grass with a few pieces of paper thrown in). I drew the truck in basic form on a sheet of paper, to serve as a pattern (my intention was to use the same truck in both pictures).

I then drew the truck’s details, minus the logo, and adhered it to the image.

For Image 2, I used a brush dip pen and India ink to draw the image – in this picture, the truck was drawn on the paper along with everything else, using the truck pattern. I filled in the details, minus the logo, and then used acrylic inks to color the picture.

To make the logo for the truck took some research time. It’s the most prominent part of the picture (I think when you include print in an art image it always attracts the first glance, which is why you have to be careful with adding words to art). I reviewed various typefaces and chose one with elements I liked. I used Word to arrange it in a circle shape. Then, not tracing it but using it as a reference and modifying it as I liked, I drew the logo. I scanned it, then cut each one out, put it on a black background so that it would have a border, and adhered them to the images.

Many times the fun of illustration is choosing the mediums and techniques that I think will best represent the text (unless the medium is specified by the commissioning party, of course, in which case my challenge is to work with that added parameter).


 

Here are the images. Go to Fictive Dream and read the story – see  which one Laura chose and how it fits the story…

Now that you’ve viewed the art, here’s more info if you are interested in seeing past works of illustration for Fictive Dream – I’ve given a few links and if you want to know more, search my blog under the topic: Fictive Dream. 

September Slam 2018

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits 2019

And…here are links to the events at the magazine’s site, Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits

Repast

You may remember that I’ve done some illustration work for the online fiction magazine Fictive Dream. I love working for editor Laura Black and I also love being involved in the world of short fiction in this way. I’ve found the process of reading a story and turning it to something visual to be really satisfying in a way I can’t quite describe – there’s the challenge of “seeing” what the words say and then conveying it that I love.

Recently Laura asked me if I would illustrate an upcoming story for the magazine, Repast, by Len Kunz. Given the world situation at the moment, I admitted to a lack of an ability to focus, and doing an illustration that would do justice to a story was just beyond me.

However, I had an idea – maybe I could search my archives and see if anything might fill the bill. I have literally thousands of images of my artworks dating back twenty years. Surely there might be something there to work from.

Contrary to usual practice, I did not want to read the story itself, feeling that doing so would cause me to restrict the possibilities and overlook something that might work. Therefore, I asked her for a general idea of what she was looking for. It worked out well – I was able to come up with a variety of images of wildly differing subjects.

Take a look at some of the candidates:

As you can see, there is quite a variety. Among the group are an altered digital photo (of my stove); a collage from the early 2000’s; and a selection of mail art postcards painted on ad cards in acrylics.

I sent Laura the selection and she made her decision. I made some adjustments so that it would fit the size requirements.


Now it’s up to you:

Go to Fictive Dream and read the story – see  which one Laura chose and how it fits the story…

*******

Now that you’ve viewed the art, here’s more info if you are interested in seeing past works of illustration for Fictive Dream – I’ve given a few links and if you want to know more, search my blog under the topic: Fictive Dream. 

September Slam 2018

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits 2019

And…here are links to the events at the magazine’s site, Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits

The Red Envelope

You may remember that I’ve done some illustration work for the online fiction magazine Fictive Dream. I love working for editor Laura Black and I also love being involved in the world of short fiction in this way. I’ve found the process of reading a story and turning it to something visual to be really satisfying in a way I can’t quite describe – there’s the challenge of “seeing” what the words say and then conveying it that I love.

Recently Laura asked me if I would illustrate an upcoming story for the magazine. I was happy to do so. The story, The Red Envelope by Dinah Cox, appears today at Fictive Dream.

I used a variety of materials and techniques in these images. The first two present a similar scene, but one is mainly done in collage and acrylics, while the second one is mostly pen with a little wash of acrylic paints. The third image is collage, composed of papers I painted with acrylics and found papers.

Many times the fun of illustration is choosing the medium that I think will best represent the text (unless the medium is specified by the commissioning party, of course, in which case my challenge is to work with that added parameter). This time I tried out several things, to give Laura a choice and to give myself some fun with it.

 


Here are the images. Go to Fictive Dream and read the story – see  which one Laura chose and how it fits the story…

 

Now that you’ve viewed the art, here’s more info if you are interested in seeing past works of illustration for Fictive Dream – I’ve given a few links and if you want to know more, search my blog under the topic: Fictive Dream. 

September Slam 2018

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits 2019

And…here are links to the events at the magazine’s site, Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits

 

The Cucumber in the Office Fridge

You may remember that I’ve done some illustration work for the online fiction magazine Fictive Dream. I love working for editor Laura Black and I also love being involved in the world of short fiction in this way. I’ve found the process of reading a story and turning it to something visual to be really satisfying in a way I can’t quite describe – there’s the challenge of “seeing” what the words say and then conveying it that I love.

Recently Laura asked me if I would illustrate an upcoming story for the magazine. I was happy to do so. The story, The Cucumber in the Office Fridge, by Kim Magowan and Michelle Ross, appears today at Fictive Dream.

In illustrating this story, I used a technique that helps me create works that are similar but not alike – for when  I want to try a couple of takes on what is essentially the same image, starting out. I felt my overall plan, an arrangement of food items on a fridge shelf, was good and I did not need to have an alternative, but I wanted see it in a couple of different ways.

Also, I was also working under some time pressure – the story needed to have its picture done for posting less than two weeks later.

So I got to work. Subject: cucumber and various other items in a refrigerator.

I made two different cucumbers drawn in India ink and colored with acrylic inks. Being the star of the show, this item needed to stand out and to occupy the center of the image so as to fit the thumbnail and full view windows on the blog at Fictive Dream.

For the other food items, things that I thought would be found in an office fridge, I drew in India ink using a dip pen. I then scanned them. Next, I arranged the items in two different configurations, with the plan that one would stay black/white except for the cucumber, and the other would contain color in the items.

Finding a good arrangement for each view, I then created backgrounds for each picture, colored the items with acrylic inks as necessary, and collaged them on to the backgrounds. In this way I could try out my compositions in an efficient way not possible had I just drawn the entire scene out. And if I made a mistake in coloring or gluing, I had the scans to fall back on; I could print out another item and try again.

Finally I did a scan of each picture and the illustrations were done for Laura’s consideration.



Here are the images. Go to Fictive Dream and read the story – see  which one Laura chose and how it fits the story…

Now that you’ve viewed the art, here’s more info if you are interested in seeing past works of illustration for Fictive Dream – I’ve given a few links and if you want to know more, search my blog under the topic: Fictive Dream. 

September Slam 2018

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits 2019

And…here are links to the events at the magazine’s site, Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2019

Flash Fiction February 2020

Revisits

 

Flash Fiction February 2020 – “Hey Diddle Diddle”

I continue with my illustrations for Flash Fiction February 2020, twenty-nine days of flash fiction stories at Fictive Dream,  an online fiction magazine featuring short stories.

For the event I created a small abstract painting for each selection – in fact, I did more than one painting per story. I am showing you all the images, day by day, throughout February. I’m also including a short write-up as to how I went about turning the authors’ words into pictorial representations.

I hope you’ll take a look at my art, then go to Fictive Dream, see which image editor Laura Black chose for the magazine, and read the story!

Thank you to Laura for her faith in my work and to the authors for such wonderful material to work with.

Today’s story is:

Hey Diddle Diddle by Frances Gapper. Read it here at Fictive Dream.

Here are the artworks on their own:

and here they are with the banner.

Comments:

This story uses a familiar nursery rhyme motif to explore the idea that lightness and darkness exist in the same space – which one is uppermost depends on perspective. In two of the three pictures I did not use the cow/moon images from the nursery rhyme, focusing instead on the line “Grass vibrant green, sky-blue sky, fluffy white clouds” fading and darkening to contrast the opening with the images brought up by the items in the bargain box and shop annex. In the third image I depicted a more literal interpretation of the nursery rhyme.

Image 43 – I used a horizontal landscape layout with the middle representing the happy scenic pasture for the idealized life. This area is enclosed by a darker sky at the top and a jagged dark field at the bottom, representing the contrasting view of life that is a step removed from the surface.

Image 44 – I used similar colors and theme as for Image 43, but this time I represented it as a progression across the page, with the happy everyday scene fading into the dark, more hidden aspect.

Image 63 – In this picture I showed the cow jumping over the moon as described in the text: “Here I am, jumping over a golden full moon in a navy sky”. This image reflects the tone of the opening section of the story, when the cute, playful aspects of the rhyme are emphasized.

Read the story at Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2020 – “Longings”

I continue with my illustrations for Flash Fiction February 2020, twenty-nine days of flash fiction stories at Fictive Dream,  an online fiction magazine featuring short stories.

For the event I created a small abstract painting for each selection – in fact, I did more than one painting per story. I am showing you all the images, day by day, throughout February. I’m also including a short write-up as to how I went about turning the authors’ words into pictorial representations.

I hope you’ll take a look at my art, then go to Fictive Dream, see which image editor Laura Black chose for the magazine, and read the story!

Thank you to Laura for her faith in my work and to the authors for such wonderful material to work with.

Today’s story is:

Longings by Eva Eliav.  Read it here at Fictive Dream.

Here are the artworks on their own:

and here they are with the banner.

Comments:

This story concerns memories a woman has of her father and her growing-up years, reflecting on dreams that did not come true and on the life that did occur. The motif of “home” is the thread that ties this story together. Various homes are mentioned: large elaborate houses, a camper, a condo, and the father’s final home after death.

Image 55 – In this image I depicted the daughter’s childhood desired home: the family lives in a large elaborate home but she would prefer a trailer and camping out at night with a campfire. I included the outline of the large house but within it I set the camper with a fire, under the stars.

Image 56 – I focused on the homes as they bound the father and daughter together through life. The first panel depicts the elaborate home that the daughter despises and the father needs. In the next panel I set the camper as the daughter pictured it, cozy at night. I extended the camper into the third frame, symbolizing the actual home the father lived in for the later years of his life as well as being symbolic of his final “home”.

Read the story at Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2020 – “The Drowned”

I continue with my illustrations for Flash Fiction February 2020, twenty-nine days of flash fiction stories at Fictive Dream,  an online fiction magazine featuring short stories.

For the event I created a small abstract painting for each selection – in fact, I did more than one painting per story. I am showing you all the images, day by day, throughout February. I’m also including a short write-up as to how I went about turning the authors’ words into pictorial representations.

I hope you’ll take a look at my art, then go to Fictive Dream, see which image editor Laura Black chose for the magazine, and read the story!

Thank you to Laura for her faith in my work and to the authors for such wonderful material to work with.

Today’s story is:

The Drowned by Cath Holland. Read it here at Fictive Dream.

Here are the artworks on their own:

and here they are with the banner.

Comments:

This story focuses on an everyday incident, the kind of thing that happens all the time, that is of no importance, and yet affects everyone in the immediate area. – the repaving of the street – and how it is interpreted by the residents and influences the future in one small area. The story is very descriptive of the changes to the street.

Image 51 – In this image I depicted the initial actions for the repaving. The yellow represents the truck and apparel of the workmen. The middle section depicts paving stones and additionally the gray rainy day. Finally, the black section represents the new asphalt with a single leaf.

Image 52 – This picture is the asphalt after some time, as described in the story. It sinks in, leaving a slight depression that catches water and leaves and forces people to step around it into the gutter. This image is a portrait of the amended street, the one the people have come to accept and live with.

Read the story at Fictive Dream.

Flash Fiction February 2020 – “The Baker’s Dream”

I continue with my illustrations for Flash Fiction February 2020, twenty-nine days of flash fiction stories at Fictive Dream,  an online fiction magazine featuring short stories.

For the event I created a small abstract painting for each selection – in fact, I did more than one painting per story. I am showing you all the images, day by day, throughout February. I’m also including a short write-up as to how I went about turning the authors’ words into pictorial representations.

I hope you’ll take a look at my art, then go to Fictive Dream, see which image editor Laura Black chose for the magazine, and read the story!

Thank you to Laura for her faith in my work and to the authors for such wonderful material to work with.

Today’s story is:

The Baker’s Dream by George Wallace. Read it here at Fictive Dream.

Here are the artworks on their own:

and here they are with the banner.

Comments:

This is a story of faith and human frailties. It concerns a baker, a loaf of bread, the face of Jesus, a miracle healing, and the implications of the collision among all these elements. Faces were a motif throughout the story, so I included them in my images, as well as the baker and the loaf of bread.

Image 57 – I focused on the moment when the baker confronts his faith, or lack of: “Why would you do a terrible thing like this to me? he asked the loaf of bread, holding it up to the lamplight and examining it sadly”, as the text says. I included the dark night sky outside the bakery, with its infinity of the unknown as a backdrop for the subdued atmosphere of the interior of the bakery.

Image 58 – I used similar colors to Image 57 to depict night and coldness. In this picture, the baker and the loaf wait together inside while the townspeople crowd outside in the dark and snow with an air of confrontation about them.

Read the story at Fictive Dream.