Tag Archives: pen and ink

Electric Meters, Glenside PA

You know what, there are so many electric meters around and all of them pretty much seem to want to keep to themselves. But they cannot hide from me.

Note: a reader gently corrected me. These are gas meters. I knew that. Of course I did. The guys are so tricky. Never mind. I still liked drawing them!

Keswick Avenue, Glenside, PA, 6/21. Pen and ink in my 8″ x 5″ sketchbook.

Southbound Toll Plaza on 95 in Baltimore MD

I’m trying to do a little more drawing. This summer (and on and on, for who knows how long, I guess until I get some new idea) I’m drawing recents sights from my daily life.

Here is a view of a toll plaza in Baltimore MD from a trip to Washington DC we made in May 2021. Pen and ink and the notebook is about 8″ x 6″ or so.

House at Norristown State Hospital

I’ve done some pictures from the Norristown Farm Park ( these drawings of Getty Cottage might ring a bell) and you may remember that the park was once the farm for the adjacent Norristown State Hospital. Patients left the hospital grounds to work on the farm in various occupations up until the 1970’s – it was thought beneficial for mental patients to have work of this sort, if they were able.

Often we walk on both properties when we go to the Farm Park – it’s easy to cross into the campus, which, though mostly closed, still has interesting buildings of all eras to view. This house is one of them. I took the photo and made the following drawing in August, 2020.

Pen, in my 8″ x 8″ sketchbook.

More Sidewalk Art: Twenty-Four

A while back I wrote a post about some artwork I did inspired by a book:  Drawing Lab for Mixed-Media Artists: 52 Creative Exercises to Make Drawing Fun, by Carla Sonheim. (Look here for that post.) It’s turned into an ongoing series. I’ve been very inspired by the same subject – the cracks in the sidewalks under my feet.

Search this blog under the term “sidewalk art” to find earlier posts in the series.

My method is to take one photo and rotate it through a circle – that way I can do four drawings from one photo. Here is the source photo for the drawings done on 7/15/20:

and here is the artwork.

More Sidewalk Art: Twenty-Three

A while back I wrote a post about some artwork I did inspired by a book:  Drawing Lab for Mixed-Media Artists: 52 Creative Exercises to Make Drawing Fun, by Carla Sonheim. (Look here for that post.) It’s turned into an ongoing series. I’ve been very inspired by the same subject – the cracks in the sidewalks under my feet.

Search this blog under the term “sidewalk art” to find earlier posts in the series.

My method is to take one photo and rotate it through a circle – that way I can do four drawings from one photo. Here is the source photo for the drawings done on 7/6/20:

 

 

and here is the art.

Getty Cottage from all sides

I’ve drawn this building from several angles, I realize, looking through my sketchbook. Let’s get the full picture once and for all.

Getty Cottage is a building at Norristown Farm Park, a place where I often run or walk. I’ve written plenty about the park and its history – short story being that the park was once the farm attached to the adjacent Norristown State Hospital. It was thought beneficial for mental patients to engage in work if they were able, and for decades this land provided food and work for the institution.

Before that time, though, it was private farmland, and this house dates to that period. There are other houses similar to Getty Cottage scattered around the park, all of them in a state of disrepair – Getty Cottage is in the best shape of any of them and is still in use, though I am not sure for what purpose.

Anyway, let’s take a look at the place. Here is a view from the back – you may remember it because I posted this picture some time back. The drawing shares a page with a depiction of the hospital’s power house, located not too far from this house.

Here is the back from the other end of the building, from July 2020.

Here is a view of the front, from June, 2020.

I think I will need to visit this location in the winter, find a different angle, and see what I end up with. What do you think?